Splendor and Majesty

“Put your sword upon your thigh, great warrior — in your splendor and in your majesty.”

(Psalm 45:4 {verse 3 in English})

The phrase, “the splendor and majesty” is a common one when referring to God. Thus, when David is bringing the Ark of the Covenant into Jerusalem, he presents the Sons of Asaph with the words of a hymn of thanksgiving to be sung — words that will form much of psalms 105, 96, and 106 (in that order)…verse 27 proclaiming:

“Splendor and majesty are before Him;

strength and joy are in his presence.”

Similarly, it is the language of Psalm 21:5; 96:6; 104:1; and 111:3. And, when God confronts Job, challenging him to try and rival the glory of the God of creation, God uses the same language:

“Clothe yourself with majesty and dignity;

put on splendor and majesty.”

(Job 40:10)

As we read the psalms, we attribute this language to God. If we use the psalms as guides for our prayer life (a practice I would commend to you), we attribute this language to God. If we use the psalms as a songbook for worship (something the Bible commands of us — Colossians 3:16), then we attribute this language to God. Yet, when we live out our daily life, do we really attribute this language to God? Do we really live like our God is filled with splendor and majesty? And do we recognize that these glorious attributes of God are spoken of in the same context of his sword of justice? He is God and has the right to demand our obedience, but do we obey?

And, if our actions do not follow our words, does that make our words hollow and lifeless? And what, then, does that hollowness say about our faith? Friends, take God’s attributes seriously and live like you really believe what it is that to which the Scriptures attest. Jesus said that if we love him we will obey his commandments (John 14:15) — that means living in a way that is consistent with the teachings of the Bible, not living on the basis of personal preference.

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